Book Review: Vampires Revealed by Rebeka Harrington

Vampires: Real or Myth?

For centuries the debate has raged; are vampires real? There has been plenty of myth and superstition regarding vampires but not a lot of truth or answers. In a unique piece of work, Bektamun a 3000 year old vampire, puts to rest all the myth and finally reveals the truth about the legendary creatures known across the globe as vampires.


Vampires Revealed is a journey of discovery. Leave behind your preconceived ideas, forget the horror stories and disregard everything you think you know about vampires. Never before have humans had and an opportunity such as this. To know the unadulterated truth, for every question you may have ever had about vampires to be answered.

AVAILABLE AT: AMAZON , SMASHWORDS

REVIEW:
On Halloween, when you pull on your cape, slide on those plastic fangs, and apply makeup, I’m sure you will be filled with thoughts of beauty and immortality that come with playing a vampire. But I want you to think about what a real vampire would be doing at that exact same moment.

In Vampires Revealed, Bektamun, a 3000 year old vampire, takes us down a long and complex road of folklore, facts, fiction, and human history involving vampires. In a journal entry fashion, she spills all the inside secret laws, politics, behaviors, scientific makeup, and thoughts that come with being one of the oldest born vampires still living.

That’s right folks. I used the words “born” and “living” in the same sentence with “vampire”. Bektamun’s story unravels all the way back to the birth of the first vampires. While telling us all the mechanics of a vampire, she shows us small slide show pieces of her life, and the growing pains of discovering what she is.

But don’t fret, for those of you with dreams of becoming a vampire, the trade secrets lay within the pages. Being a vampire is not for everyone though, even if you get permission from the counsel (there is quite an extensive testing session), persuade a vampire into falling in love with you (almost impossible), talk that said vampire into changing you, you would still have to live through the transformation (which doesn’t have a high success rate), and then have to shed your humanity and cope with your new and overwhelming existence (some actually go insane from the bombarding of new sensations). While being a made vampire is different from being a born vampire, Bektamun is unable to describe the feelings involved with the transformation, since she has always been a vampire. She introduces us to a made vampire, Nicole, as she tries to explain to the reader how it has changed her life.

Overall the story gave us a look at what the hardships would be in becoming a vampire. The human disguises, the constant identity changes, the death of people you care for, always moving, always adapting to your surroundings, the strict vampire laws (almost all punishable by death), and the strange catch twenty-two of embracing myths because most of them are wrong and deter humans from their discovery. In another words, vampires, pretend to be human, pretending to be vampires, so that they can pass as human. Confused yet? Bektamun will do a better job of sorting it out for you.

            FROM THE BOOK:

In all honesty, there are more than a couple of myths vampires themselves had a hand in perpetuating. We didn’t start them, but when it became apparent we could use them to our advantage we shamelessly did.

Rebeka Harrington style of writing and storytelling took me back to Anne Rice’s Interview with a Vampire, but the story has been revamped (pun intended) for a more modern and classroom feel. I found some areas slightly repetitive, but overall it is a fascinating read for vampire lovers all around. It’s a compilation of the pros and cons of what a vampire truly is, and everything that makes them function, even down to their anatomy. Rebeka does a fine job of blurring the lines of reality and fiction as the story moves on. It is not a story of characters, obstacles, and resolution, but the teaching that vampires are killers, and always will be (no sparkling). A vampire may befriend you, and take you in as a pet, but in the end, you are still just a source of food for them. It leaves you wondering: Would becoming a vampire really be as great as some people think it would be? You’ll have to read the evidence and decide for yourself.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Rebeka Harrington
Author Biography
Raised in country Victoria, Rebeka started her writing career working for the local newspaper as a teenager. While she decided not to pursue this as a career, she has always enjoyed writing and being creative.

With so many varied interests and eccletic taste in most things, Rebeka enjoys incorporating all of them in her writing. She particularly enjoys writing about vampires.

Rebeka seeks to define and explain vampires in a way not done before. This has been achieved with her debut title "Vampires Revealed". Following titles will revolve around exploring the world and characters created in her first release.

Currently Rebeka lives in Melbourne with her “demented” but lovable cat, dividing her time between writing and managing a small boutique entertainment agency.

To follow Rebeka's writing, check out her website, http://vampiresrevealed.com/

Interview of author Glynn James

Today I have an interview with Glynn James. He is the author of Diary Of The Displaced, Chasing Spirits, The Last To Fall, and The Broken Lands (being published in episodes and not fully available). His books can be found at Smashwords and on Amazon. 

Tell us about yourself.

I live out town in England called Wellingborough, but originate a massive three miles from there, across the mists and into another dimension called Finedon. I've written in almost every genre that there is, most of it absolute rubbish. Some would suggest it still is. I'm glad that others disagree.

How long have you been writing?

I started writing when I was eight years old, straight after I read "I Am Legend" by Richard Matheson. I loved the book and it's remained one of my favourites ever since it introduced me to horror. At the time I thought I could write a different ending, so I did. It had Darth Vader, Aliens & Cowboys in it and was terrible. At the time, I thought it was the best thing ever.

Do you have any rituals when you write; is there any one thing that inspires you?

I always stop writing in the middle of a sentence, so that next time I go back I can just jump straight into the scene again. Blank pages are hardest thing to overcome with writing, bar nothing. I day dream a lot, and that's where my ideas come from. The things that inspire me and cause those ideas are usually very small details, things that usually go unnoticed, like a number or a name carved into a tree, or a broken window in a building that I've never been in.

What are your future plans for writing, do you have any works in progress?

I have over fifty unfinished works. Some that may never get finished, but many will. Two of them are the continuation of the Displaced series, but many are novellas or short stories, some related to the Displaced books and in the same "world", others completely unrelated, even in genre. The Joe Dean book "The Last to Fall" is the first in a novella series, and I have outlines for at least four others in that series.

I also have plans to do a drama series of fiction books. Kind of like TV dramas, in that they are about "normal" people's lives, except this will be in a quite abnormal setting. I haven't decided the setting yet, maybe a classic fantasy world or maybe post apocalyptic.

At the start of 2012 I'm collaborating with Michael Stephen Fuchs (http://michaelfuchs.org/razorsedge/), who is a terrific writer of high octane modern techno thrillers, (Delta Force and hackers and all that awesome stuff) whose last few novels were published by Pan Macmillan. We're going to write an action combat thriller with zombies vs special ops. I think he will write the special ops and I'll write the zombies, or something like that. My zombies are so gonna eat all his best characters.

Now I'm going to ask you some horror related questions, just so the reader can get to dig into your brain a little.

Who or what was your boogey man when you were growing up?

Worzel Gummidge. Everything about that program was terrifying.
Later on, the Nazi Mutants from "American Werewolf in London". They were nasty.

Who do you think is scarier; a fictitious monster, such as a werewolf, or one that could be real, like a psychopath?

What do you mean? You don't believe in werewolves?
You've never visited Finedon.
For me, fictional characters are more scary. The mind and the imagination is unlimited in its ability to frighten itself. Though, I've never met a psychopath. I would imagine they are pretty damn scary too.

If you're being chased by a monster, would you look over your shoulder behind you to see how close it was?

I've got DogThing. What makes you think the monster would be the one doing the chasing?
               If I absolutely had to be the one running, I'd look back.

               After I had just run past someone else.
               (Preferably someone I don't like.)


In the way of tradition monsters, do you prefer the old tradition? Example: Vampires and sunlight, werewolves and the cycles of the moon, and stumbling zombies. Or you do you like the break out of new and improved monsters? Example: Indestructible vampires, werewolves shifting at will, and runner zombies?

I definitely have a fence pole sticking into me on this one.

In a lot of ways I prefer the old monsters, but mainly because they were monsters. I think more recently too many books make them too cuddly. I can't deny that it doesn't have its place though.

On the other hand, runner zombies and hybrids of various monsters are a huge part of a lot of my creations. I like to mix things up. Like in "The Last to Fall" and "Diary of the Displaced". There are various types of what I call zombies. There are the traditional slow, virus-spreading ones, but also there are ones that are really monstrous creations by some madman. Creating new ways to make something scary is what I love most about monster creation. And it's about time we had some new bad guys.

The maw are another example. Many people have said that they are waiting for DogThing to turn into a human and I've been asked why my werewolves stay in wolf form so much. They don't. They aren't traditional werewolves. They are sentient hell hounds. I've nearly finished a short story that i'll release at some point soon. That short story clears up exactly what the maw are.

Here is the mother loaded question. The zombie apocalypse has fallen upon us. Society and government has collapsed. All of technology and conveniences of modern day have crumbled. Groups of survivors are gathering the remnants of what is left and trying to rebuild a new world. You have to start over from scratch. You have nothing. You have to build your own house, grow your own food, and make your own fuel, medicine, and clothing. The question is this: What is the one thing (thing, not person) you would miss the most in the world that you live now?

Electricity.

Is there anything you would like to tell the readers?

To everyone who has read one of my books, thank you for giving an unknown writer of weird stuff a chance to entertain you for a few hours.

Tell us something that most people don’t know about you.

            My religion is The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (No really, look it up).

            Join us. Pirates are cool and can save us from global warming.


Chocolate: milk, white, or dark?

            Can we add mint chocolate to that?

            Mint Aero is heaven in a packet.


Are you a night or day person?

Night

Favorite song?

"Name" by The Goo Goo Dolls.

Favorite book?

            "I am Legend" by Richard Matheson.

            "The graveyard book" by Neil Gaiman is a close second.


Favorite movie?

            "The Green Mile" starring Tom Hanks.

            "Castaway" also starring Tom Hanks in close second.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain. I look forward to reading more from you and wish you the best of luck in your writing. 

An interview of author Richard Farnsworth.


Today I have Richard Farnsworth here to answer some burning questions about his writing and his monsters. My review of his Succumbing to Gravity has gone live on the LL Book Reviews website and it can be viewed BY CLICKING HERE


I am Rick Farnsworth, a husband and father, a scientist, working as an expatriate in Tblisi, Georgia, a twenty-seven year Army/Army reserve office, Apache helicopter pilot and Iraq War veteran.

Oh, I wrote these two cool books: Succumbing to Gravity (CLICK FOR AMAZON PAGE
and Gift of the Bouda (CLICK FOR AMAZON PAGE)

My Amazon authors page is available by (CLICK HERE) , my goodreads author page is at (CLICK HERE) and my blog can be found at (http://genuineapocrypha.blogspot.com)

How long have you been writing?

I have been writing technically for most of my adult life, but I started to work on writing as a creative outlet in 2005.

Is there any one thing that inspires you or do you have any rituals when you write?

I think you can be inspired by any number of things around you. I am inspired to capture scenes or images in writing that I find unique, actions that have a nuanced subtext. My ritual for writing, hmm. Well, I build a playlist for each book I am going to write as I outline (and I’m not a heavy outliner - but I do spend time on the plot before I start to write). I pick songs that capture some aspect of the vibe I am going for with the story. When I sit down to write, I hit the playlist and reread the last chapter (conducting a first-round edit), and then start in where that chapter left off.


When you wrote Gift of the Bouda, you left it open for a sequel, but with Succumbing to Gravity there is very little wiggle room, do you have preference? Do you prefer to write a series of books, or do you like to just get the story with in one book?

I think some stories are meant to be complete and others just leave an opening, so no, I don’t really have a preference. With STG I felt that the ending needed to be the way it was and that didn't leave room for a sequel (even though I liked the characters and could have gladly written part two). With GOB I was telling the story of how John, the MC, was dealing with his new life, and though the story arc was complete, it didn't require me to finish with him. So, I have the outline for GOB II…


What are your future plans for writing, do you have any works in progress?

Of course. I am about ½ way through a Military Science Fiction novel (46K words). I know, that’s a big stretch for me. It focuses on small unit engagements with Army Dudes (with all of the weapons and mission support applications I would have loved to have had in Iraq) and bad guy aliens. I use my biology background to build a credible and very different alien. I think it will end up with a strong military scifi thrust but a definite pulpy/horror vibe (think the movie Aliens 2). I would also like to write part 2 of GOB, and I have a ‘weird western’ short story/novella that is crawling around the edges of my consciousness.


What is your favorite book or book series?

I don’t have ‘A’ favorite and I’m an eclectic, non-genre specific reader. I read military historical fiction (Kent and Cornwall), Horror (Kuntz and Lansdale), I really love Noirishness (Robert Parker, Elmore Leonard), and everything else (Octavia Butler, Charlie Huston, Palahniuk, and the list goes on).


Now I'm going to ask you some horror related questions, just so the reader can get to dig into your brain a little. 

Who do you think is scarier; a fictitious monster, such as a werewolf, or one that could be real, like a psychopath?

I think real monsters are much scarier than those in stories. But I prefer to objectify my monsters and give them legitimate reasons to be bad, as opposed to the ‘bad guys’ that hide among us.


Would you prefer to be the monster or the hero in a story?

In real life I would prefer the role of hero, but in the story I would prefer to be the antihero. Not the villain, but the guy/monster that gets the job done according to his/it’s own code of justice.


In the way of traditional monsters, do you prefer the old tradition?

I bias toward a retooled version of the traditional monster. I think that if you chose to write about a trope you have to respect the conventions of that trope. If you want something completely new you should make completely new monsters, and not bother with old conventional monsters, right?  So by retooled, I mean really dealing with issues that a monster would have in a biologically/psychologically/socially appropriate way. For instance my were-hyena really changes, he doesn't just slip on a hyena coat. It is much more like the transformation scene in ‘American werewolf in London’ than the werewolves in ‘Trueblood’. And then there are other issues, he deals with, like when he swallows a femur, what happens to it when he changes back to a man? Same thing with the fallen angel in STG, how bad would it suck to be kicked out of heaven? Heroin addiction doesn't seem that implausible.


Here is the mother loaded question. The zombie apocalypse has fallen upon us. Society and government has collapsed. All of technology and conveniences of modern day have crumbled. Groups of survivors are gathering the remnants of what is left and trying to rebuild a new world. You have to start over from scratch. You have nothing. You have to build your own house, grow your own food, and make your own fuel, medicine, and clothing. The question is this: What is the one thing(thing, not person)you would miss the most in the world that you live now?


This one is fairly easy after living in a Former Soviet Union country for a year (and then the year in Iraq in the war as well). More than anything else I would miss ‘choices’. In our American consumerist society we have been led to believe that in all of the different goods and services we can obtain, there is a real difference between one choice and another (coke versus pepsi seriously in the big schema it doesn’t matter). But when you have limited choices you really miss that. Of all the choices I would miss, I think I would miss which American Pale Ale…decisions, decisions…

Thank you for answering my questions today Richard. I truly enjoy your books. If you haven't had a chance to read Richard's books, I highly recommend them. You will not be disappointed. 

An interview of author Lee Emerick

Today I have a fellow author, Lee Emerick, talking about writing and the things that he likes. Lee is the author of several zombie books for all of you zombie lovers out there, plus several other works. 
My name is Lee Emerick.

I’m 29, married with two kids. The wife is pregnant with the third.

I have a pet dog called Holly, a cat named Molly, a bearded dragon named Freddy and a snake called Dave.

In the day, I sell mortgage and insurance products and live a normal life, at night I write about how it will all come to a horrible end when the zombies arrive.


How long have you been writing?


Its three years since I finished my first book Super Nova. Therefore, I would say that long. I have attempted several books before this but they never came to anything.


Do you have any rituals when you write; is there any one thing that inspires you? 


No rituals, no specific inspiration. When I write I require minimal interruption, good lighting and quiet so that I can let my imagination run wild.

What are your future plans for writing, do you have any works in progress? 

I tend to work on two books at a time. I have just released Mind of a Killer, which I was working on at the same time as Solar Apocalypse that I am still writing. I have also started Before the Zombie Apocalypse, which is a prequel to my Zombie Apocalypse series. I have at least ten other books in my work queue that I am planning to write, some are listed on my website.


Now I'm going to ask you some horror related questions, just so the reader can get to dig into your brain a little.

Who or what was your boogey man when you were growing up?


As a child, I had a very active imagination and to a certain extent, I still do. In terms of boogey men there were two that stick out in my mind, one of which I will share with you.

He was a Victorian or Edwardian era middle-aged man. He wore a white pinstriped shirt with the sleeves rolled up, brown trousers and black boots. His skin was green in colour and he was sweaty and dirty. His hair was shaven or short and he sported a mustache.

The figure of this man used to torment me in my sleep.

At the time, I shared a bedroom with my younger brother Byron. The bedroom was quiet large in size, yet our beds were in one corner of the room by adjacent walls. The beds were double-deckers, below was a play area and draws, above was the bed its self.

As I lay shaking beneath the bed covers, the figure would emerge from the windows at the other end of the room. In his has he carried a wooden club not to dissimilar to a wide baseball bat or a club you would expect a caveman to have carried.

He would walk into the room with his right side facing me as he moved towards the opposite wall. As soon as he would make it half way he would stop and turn to face me somewhat surprised. In his eyes, there was menace and anger. He was displeased that I was in the same room as him.

As he took steps towards me, I would hide under the bed sheets where I would remain for what seemed like hours before I would emerge. Byron never seemed to be awake when he visited; only I ever saw him.


Who do you think is scarier; a fictitious monster, such as a werewolf, or one that could be real, like a psychopath? 


You would have thought it would have been something real, like a psychopath, clown or a second hand car dealer, something like that. Alas, no. What scares me the most, what sends shivers down my spine and I regularly dream about are zombies!

If you're being chased by a monster, would you look over your shoulder behind you to see how close it was? 

To be honest I would probably stand and fight rather than run, as I would likely die anyway. Unless of course it was huge, such as Godzilla or a T-Rex, then I would stare in amazement as I am crushed or chewed to death. If it were a slow zombie then I would probably run to avoid infection and stop for a break now and again to taunt it a little.

In the way of tradition monsters, do you prefer the old tradition? Example: Vampires and sunlight, werewolves and the cycles of the moon, and stumbling zombies. Or you do you like the break out of new and improved monsters? Example: Indestructible vampires, werewolves shifting at will, and runner zombies? 

Deep down I prefer the classic monsters although the new ones can be entertaining.
Still, I much prefer to see a hoard of shuffling zombies that overwhelm you in number rather than a zombie sprinting at you. Both would be scary I suppose but the classics are, well, classic!

Here is the mother loaded question. The zombie apocalypse has fallen upon us. Society and government has collapsed. All of technology and conveniences of modern day have crumbled. Groups of survivors are gathering the remnants of what is left and trying to rebuild a new world. You have to start over from scratch. You have nothing. You have to build your own house, grow your own food, and make your own fuel, medicine, and clothing. The question is this: What is the one thing (thing, not person) you would miss the most in the world that you live now? 

Most likely my Android smart phone as I use it for everything! I really would be lost without it… Can I take it with me? Also, do you know when this might happen, as I would need to get a solar charger for my phone?

I'm hoping no time soon, I am completely unprepared, but I'm sure if it comes down to the wire, there will be some mass looting around that time. You might find one then. 


Is there anything you would like to tell the readers? 

Please read my books. If you do read my books then please review them.
I have regular discounts and free giveaways, which I advise of on my blog, which can be found at www.blog.leeemerick.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about me then please visit my website at www.leeemerick.co.uk or find me on goodreads at http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4611984.Lee_Emerick.

Tell us something that most people don’t know about you. 
Most people don’t know that I have broken several world records. Largely because it is not true…

Chocolate: milk, white, or dark?

I have a confession to make, I do not really like chocolate so none of the above! 


Are you a night or day person?

A day person.
Well, a crack of dawn person.
Not through choice but due to the kids and a wife.


Favorite song? 


All time favorite is quiet tricky. Most likely Knights of Cydonia by Muse.

Favorite book?

More a favorite series of books being Dune.


Favorite movie?

The Thing or Aliens.

Thanks for stopping by Lee, and if you are looking for some zombie books, check out Lee's writing.